XRF analysis of village and urban basalt architecture in the Hippos Territorium during the Roman period

Mechael Osband, Michael Eisenberg, Jeffery R. Ferguson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This case study examines the use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) as an effective method for defining distinct chemical compositions of local basalt stone from different sources in the Roman period, even when their quarries have not been identified. It also deals with the archaeological question if public and monumental structures from a village and urban site shared the same stone sources and stonemason's workshops. Ninety-six samples from the Hippos Territorium, mainly from the polis of Hippos and the village of Majduliyya, were analyzed. XRF was found to be an effective method for defining distinct chemical compositions of local basalt materials from different sources. The distinct composition of the basalt stones between the two sites provided valuable insights into socio-economic relationships, shedding light on the nature of city–village dynamics in the region. Additionally, it aids in discerning whether diverse basalt sources were utilized in both private and public constructions, as well as installations within a single site. Methodological questions and the application of this method in the archaeological research of basalt-based architecture are also addressed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchaeometry
DOIs
StatePublished - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Authors. Archaeometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of University of Oxford.

Keywords

  • basalt
  • Golan
  • Hippos
  • Majduliyya
  • Sussita
  • urban–rural
  • XRF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Archaeology

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