Workplace Exposures and Cognitive Function during Adulthood: Evidence from National Survey of Midlife Development and the O ∗ NET

Joseph G. Grzywacz, Dikla Segel-Karpas, Margie E. Lachman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Expand understanding of the role of selected workplace exposures (ie, occupational complexity, conflict in the workplace, pace of work, and physical hazards) in adults' cognitive function. Methods: Cross-sectional data (n=1991) from the second wave of the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study; restricted to participants who completed telephone-based cognitive assessments of episodic memory, executive functioning, and self-perceived memory. Occupational exposure data were harvested from the O ∗ NET Release 6.0. Results: Greater complexity was associated with better self-perceived memory among women and men, and better episodic memory and executive functioning among women. Greater physical hazards were independently associated with poorer episodic memory and executive functioning. Conclusions: Objective assessments of physical and psychosocial exposures in the workplace are independently associated with cognitive outcomes in adulthood, with psychosocial exposures being particularly pronounced among women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-541
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Aging (2P01AG020166-07).

Publisher Copyright:
© Copyright 2016 American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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