Women in Philistia: The archaeological record of the Iron Age

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Our image of Philistine women is heavily influenced by the biblical narrative of Samson and Delilah (Judg. 13), and even more so by baroque imagery of their ill-fated relationship. The moment of Delilah’s betrayal was portrayed on canvas in Anthony van Dyck’s, Rembrandt’s, and Peter Paul Rubens’ identically titled works, Samson and Delilah. Depictions in pieces of performance art include Milton’s (1671) tragedy Samson Agonistes-on which Handel’s (1743) oratorio Samson (HWV 57) is based-and also Cecil B. DeMille’s 1949 feature, Samson and Delilah.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWomen in Antiquity
Subtitle of host publicationReal Women across the Ancient World
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages501-510
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781317219910
ISBN (Print)9781138808362
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Stephanie Lynn Budin and Jean MacIntosh Turfa.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (all)
  • Social Sciences (all)

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