Women candidates for diving with oxygen-enriched gas mixtures have a lower end tidal CO2 than men during moderate exercise

Mirit Eynan, Amir Abramovich, Yehuda Arieli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have previously determined the thresholds for CO2 detection (conscious recognition of elevated CO2) and retention in male divers, beyond which a diving candidate should not continue his diving activity due to an increased risk of CNS oxygen toxicity. The purpose of the present study was to establish whether there is a difference in end tidal PCO2 between male and female divers who use oxygen-enriched gas mixtures. Ventilatory and perceptual responses to variations in inspired CO2 (range 0-42mmHg) were assessed during moderate exercise in 18 males and 18 females. End tidal PCO2 was lower in the female divers when breathing oxygen with 42mmHg CO2 (58.2±3.0mmHg vs. 61.5±4.5mmHg, P<0.03). These results suggest that female divers have a lower end tidal CO2 than males when breathing a hyperoxic gas mixture during exercise, which might imply that women are less susceptible to CNS oxygen toxicity than men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)632-638
Number of pages7
JournalRespiratory Physiology and Neurobiology
Volume189
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide detection
  • Carbon dioxide retention
  • Central nervous system oxygen toxicity
  • Ventilatory response
  • Women divers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • General Neuroscience
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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