Winds of change: How street-level bureaucrats actively represent minority clients by influencing majority clients—The context of LGB Israeli teachers

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The literature dealing with representative bureaucracy emphasizes the role that minority street-level bureaucrats may play when, directly and indirectly, they actively represent clients with whom they share a common identity. My study goes further, contributing to the implementation literature, by examining why and how these street-level bureaucrats use their discretion to shape non-minority clients' attitudes toward minorities. I explore this phenomenon empirically through interviews with 36 Israeli lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) teachers. I analyze the traditional methods they routinely adopt, such as exposing students to information about minorities, encouraging open discussions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) issues in the classroom, and entrepreneurially developing and introducing innovative learning programs. I illustrate how they respond to ad hoc cases (e.g., protecting LGBTQ+ clients or taking advantage of outside events to promote understanding of relevant issues) and the approach of leading by example.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalPublic Administration
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - 2022

    Bibliographical note

    Publisher Copyright:
    © 2022 The Authors. Public Administration published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Public Administration

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