Who internalizes courtesy stigma and how? A study among Israeli Arab family caregivers of persons with dementia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The expected rise in the number of persons with dementia is accompanied by an increasing interest in understanding and reducing the stigmatic beliefs experienced by family caregivers of persons with the disease. While researchers have recently distinguished between family caregivers’ perceptions of public stereotypes (i.e., courtesy stigma) and the internalization of these perceptions (i.e., affiliate stigma), no study has yet assessed the characteristics of dementia caregivers who internalize courtesy stigma and how they do so. The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of family caregivers of persons with dementia who internalize courtesy stigma, and to investigate this internalization process. Method: Structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 175 Israeli Arab family caregivers (87.4% female; 71.4% adult children; mean age = 54.28) for persons with Alzheimer’s disease. Results: Overall, half of the participants reported experiencing affiliate stigma as a result of taking care of a relative with dementia. Regression analyses showed that lower educational level, increased courtesy stigma and lower levels of social support were the main predictors of affiliate stigma. Social support partially mediated the association between courtesy and affiliate stigma. Conclusion: Our findings provide important insights for the conceptual understanding and the development of interventions to reduce stigma among family caregivers of persons with dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1153-1160
Number of pages8
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jul 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Affiliate stigma
  • courtesy stigma
  • dementia
  • family caregivers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Gerontology
  • Psychiatric Mental Health

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