When disaster becomes commonplace: Reaction of children and adolescents to prolonged terrorist attacks in Israel

Shlomo A. Sharlin, Victor Moin, Rivka Yahav

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine, in conditions of prolonged terror, the possible influences of yet another terrorist attack as an additional traumatic event on children's reactions in the emotional, behavioral, and cognitive spheres, and to identify any mediating factors. The sample included 747 students in junior high schools in three Israeli cities. None of the participants was directly exposed to terrorist attacks, but they all lived with the possibility of daily terror. The research focused on fear as the most common and widespread reaction to terror and war. Short-term and long-term symptoms of fear were studied. It was found that an additional terrorist attack had no significant influence on children's emotional, cognitive, or behavioral spheres. Terror that has become habitual becomes negligible. Children learn to adjust to loss without experiencing grief.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-114
Number of pages20
JournalSocial Work in Health Care
Volume43
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 29 Aug 2006

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Children
  • Fear
  • Terror

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Community and Home Care

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