What can errors tell us about specific language impairment deficits? Semantic and morphological cuing in a sentence completion task

Rama Novogrodsky, Varda Kreiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The lexical retrieval ability of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical language development was compared. Fifty Hebrew-speaking children participated: 15 school-age with SLI, 20 typically developing, matched on age to the SLI group and 15 younger, typically developing matched on naming performance to the SLI group. Participants were tested in a sentence completion task with semantic cuing and with morphological cuing. SLI children performed poorer than the chronological-age group and similarly to the naming-matched group. Error patterns showed a qualitative difference between the SLI and naming-matched groups. The results suggest that lexical retrieval of children with SLI is delayed and qualitatively different from that of typically developing children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)812-825
Number of pages14
JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
Volume29
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Nov 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Derivation
  • SLI
  • lexical-retrieval
  • morphological-cueing
  • semantic-cueing
  • sentence-completion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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