Vaccine and Psychological Booster: Factors Associated With Older Adults’ Compliance to the Booster COVID-19 Vaccine in Israel

Boaz M. Ben-David, Shoshi Keisari, Yuval Palgi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Israel became the first country to offer the booster COVID-19 vaccination. The study tested for the first time the role of sense of control (SOC) due to vaccinations, trust and vaccination hesitancy (VH), and their association with compliance to the booster COVID-19 vaccine among older adults, during the first 2 weeks of the campaign. 400 Israeli citizens (≥ 6 years old), eligible for the booster vaccine, responded online. They completed demographics, self-reports, and booster vaccination status (already vaccinated, booked-a-slot, vaccination intent, and vaccination opposers). Multinomial logistic regression was conducted with pseudo R 2 =.498. Higher SOC and lower VH were related to the difference between early and delayed vaccination (booked-a-slot, OR = 0.7 [0.49‐0.99]; 2.2 [1.32‐3.62], intent OR = 0.6 [0.42‐0.98]; 2.7 [1.52‐4.86]), as well as to rejection (OR = 0.3 [0.11‐0.89]; 8.5 [3.39‐21.16]). Increased trust was only related to the difference between early vaccinations and vaccine rejection (OR = 0.3 [0.11‐0.89]). We suggest that SOC, as well as low VH, can be used as positive motivators, encouraging earlier vaccinations in older age.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2022.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • epidemiology
  • sense of control
  • trust
  • vaccination hesitancy
  • vaccine compliance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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