Using an Advance Time Meter display as means to reduce driving speed

David Navon, Ronen Kasten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective Testing an experimental means to reduce motivation to drive fast. Background One determinant of that motivation may be a wrong presumption, demonstrated here: Time to reach destination declines about linearly to increase in driving speed. Actually, that time is a linear function of advance time, the inverse of speed. It is hypothesized that the behavioral by-product of the popularity of that fallacy could be counteracted by introducing an essential change to the speed-based continuous feedback provided to the driver - from a speedometer displaying instantaneous velocity to a gauge reporting advance time (denoted ATM), so that both average driving speed and speed variance are reduced. Method In two driving simulator experiments, driving speed of participants presented with either of the two types of gauge was recorded. Results The main finding is that driving with feedback provided by an ATM gauge following prior briefing led to a significant reduction - ∼11 km/h - in mean speed, as well as to a significant reduction in between-driver speed variability, as compared with driving with an ordinary speedometer. It was also found that no significant difference was observed in the speeding behavior of participants driving with an ATM display for three ∼2-h sessions administered in three different days, so that the last session took place within seven days from the first one. Conclusion The ATM gauge serves to reduce motivation to speed. Application Widespread use of the ATM gauge may result in reduction in number and intensity of accidents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-27
Number of pages12
JournalTransportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour
Volume35
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a grant from the Research Fund of the Insurance Companies Association (in Israel) to David Navon. We are indebted to Yuval Shim’oni as well as to Asaf Shapira for programming the simulator and the experiments, to Amit Pomerants for assistance in developing software for various implementation ends, as well as to Ma’ayan Ben-Eliezer, Aviv Ben-Shabat, El’ad Gvirtz, Ziv Shina and Nadav Hirsch for running the experiments.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords

  • Average road speed
  • Motivation to speed
  • Reduction in driving speed
  • Speed-related feedback
  • Speeding behavior
  • Speedometer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Applied Psychology

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