Too smart for their own good? A study of perceived cognitive overqualification in the workforce

Saul Fine, Baruch Nevo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the concept of cognitive overqualification, the possession of a higher level of cognitive ability than is required for a given job. Among 156 US based customer service representatives, cognitive overqualification was found to be associated with job dissatisfaction, but was only weakly related to measures of job and training performance. The results of this study provide support for the common practice among personnel managers to reject overqualified job applicants, as these individuals may be more likely to develop negative job attitudes, although not necessarily in anticipation of their poorer job performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)346-355
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Keywords

  • Cognitive ability
  • Overqualification
  • Performance
  • Satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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