Time does not heal all wounds: Quality of life and psychological distress of people who survived the Holocaust as children 55 years later

Marianne Amir, Rachel Lev-Wiesel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study assessed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, psychological distress, and subjective quality of life (QoL) in a group of 43 child Holocaust survivors and a community sample of 44 persons who had not personally experienced the Holocaust. The participants were administered the PTSD-Scale, the SCL-90, and the WHOQOL-Bref. Results showed that the child survivors had higher PTSD symptom scores, higher depression, anxiety, somatization, and anger-hostility scores; and lower physical, psychological, and social QoL than did the comparison group. The findings suggest that the psychological consequences of being a child during the Holocaust can be long lasting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-299
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Holocaust child survivors
  • PTSD
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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