Therapist-client sex: Clients' retrospective reports

Eli Somer, Meir Saadon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Therapists will be more effective practitioners when they understand the factors that contribute to sexual boundary violations. The authors' interviews with former victims indicated that offending therapists were mostly reputable psychologists working alone, and that boundary violations developed gradually. The clients were often victims of child sexual abuse. Many reported pleasurable feelings during the affair but saw the experience as hurtful or exploitative in retrospect. The authors' findings imply that practitioners should minimize seemingly innocuous physical consolation or self-disclosure, especially with survivors of child abuse. They are encouraged to select offices with other professionals and to participate in peer-supervision activities. ELI SOMER received his PhD in 1984 from the University of Florida. He is a senior lecturer at the University of Haifa Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Studies, and clinical director of Maytal - Israel Institute for Treatment and Study of Stress. MEIR SAADON received his PhD in 1995 from the University of Haifa. He is an associate faculty member at the University of Haifa Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Studies and director of training at Maytal - Israel Institute for Treatment and Study of Stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)504-509
Number of pages6
JournalProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Therapist-client sex: Clients' retrospective reports'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this