The relationship of proximity to tension areas and size of settlement to fear levels of Israeli children

Avigdor Klingman, Ezra Wiesner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A children's version of the Israeli Fear Survey Schedule was administered to 171 children in the central region of Israel and to 320 children along the tense Northern border. Proximity to the border and size of settlement were found to be factors in the fear levels observed. Beyond the finding that children closer to tension areas had higher fear levels, those from small settlements had higher fear levels than those from medium or large settlements. It was proposed that the variable of population size be viewed as mediated by a sense of social isolation by the subjects in small towns.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-323
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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