The relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and paternal parenting of adult children among ex-prisoners of war: A longitudinal study

Gadi Zerach, Talya Greene, Tsachi Ein-Dor, Zahava Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aversive impact of combat and combat-induced posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on parenting of young children has been examined in a few studies. Nevertheless, the toll of war captivity on parenting and the long-term relations between posttraumatic symptoms and paternal parenting of adult children remains unknown. This longitudinal study examined paternal parenting of adult children among war veterans, some of whom were held in captivity. Furthermore, we examined the mediating role of PTSD symptoms in the association between captivity and parenting. The sample included two groups of male Israeli veterans from the 1973 Yom Kippur War: ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs) and comparable veterans who had not been held captive. Both groups were assessed via self-report measures of PTSD at three time points: Time 1 (18 after the war), Time 2 (30 after the war), and Time 3 (35 after the war) years after the war. Results shows that ex-POWs reported lower levels of positive parenting compared to comparison group veterans at Time 3. Furthermore, PTSD symptoms at Time 1, Time 2, and Time 3 mediated the association between captivity experience and parenting at Time 3. In addition, it was found that increases in the levels of PTSD symptom clusters over time were associated with lower levels of positive parenting at Time 3.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)274-284
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Captivity
  • Ex-POWs
  • PTSD
  • Parenting
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • War

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and paternal parenting of adult children among ex-prisoners of war: A longitudinal study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this