The One-Canvas model as a visual container for the researcher-supervisor

Vika Lis-Ron, Tami Gavron, Michal Bat-Or

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: This article presents an art-based heuristic study of the author’s experiences as the supervisor of an art-based supervision group using the One-Canvas model that involves using response art in art therapy clinical supervision. Aims: The goal was to gain insights into the nature of art-based supervision, in terms of the role of the supervisor and the role of art in the One-Canvas supervision model as expressed on the supervisor's canvas. Methods: The researcher-supervisor led 10 structured supervision sessions using the One-Canvas model. She created her own canvas as a parallel response to the One-Canvas supervision group she led. The researcher-supervisor’s artworks were analysed according to the principles of art-based qualitative heuristic research based on the phenomenological tradition. The reflective journal, an imaginary and a narrative stories were analysed according to narrative tradition. Results: The findings revealed four central themes: creating in layers, discovery, expanding perspectives, and the use of the canvas as a container for the supervisor. Conclusions: The One-Canvas method allowed the researcher-supervisor to engage in self-research, enhance her abilities, provide ongoing knowledge, and serve as a reflective container. Implications for practice: Artmaking on the canvas acted as a complement for the researcher-supervisor that allowed for discoveries and insights about the supervision group, the supervisor's experiences and the supervision relationship. Supervisors would thus benefit from using a parallel response art on canvas to deepen and enrich supervision and supervisory skills in art therapy. The discussion deals with the limitations of the study and suggestions for further research. Plain-language summary: The main goal of clinical supervision is to help therapists develop their clinical skills. The supervisee gains a deeper understanding of the therapeutic relationship through self-reflection, which supports change in therapy. Supervision methods that incorporate artmaking make implicit, non-verbal communication visible and allow for discussion and joint thinking, which improves the therapeutic relationship. This article presents an art-based heuristic study of the author’s experiences and learning as supervisor of an art-based supervision group using the One-Canvas model. In the original One-Canvas supervision model (El Duende One-Canvas Process Painting; [Miller, A. (2012). Inspired by El-Duende: One-canvas process painting in art therapy supervision. Art Therapy, 29(4), 166–173. https://doi.org/10.1080/07421656.2013.730024]), the supervisee is asked to respond through art on the same single canvas after every therapeutic session. Here, the researcher-supervisor extended the One-Canvas model by creating her own canvas as a parallel response to the One-Canvas supervision group that she led. This study used an art-based heuristic research approach. Art-based research implements a creative process to understand and examine experiences. Heuristic research involves the researcher’s internal search to uncover the meaning and essence of experiences. Through the supervisor's parallel response art on her canvas, the current study aimed to better understand the nature of art-based supervision in terms of the role of the supervisor and the role of art. The findings revealed four central themes: creating in layers, discovery, expanding perspectives, and the use of the canvas as a ‘container’ (a safe space for discussion and exploration) for the supervisor. Art-making on the canvas led to discoveries and insights about the supervision group, the supervisor's experiences, and the supervisor-supervisor relationship. The One-Canvas method allowed the researcher-supervisor to conduct self-research, develop her abilities, provide ongoing knowledge, and serve as a reflective container. These results suggest that supervisors can make parallel use of the canvas to deepen and enrich the supervision process and the supervisor's skills in the field of art therapy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Art Therapy: Inscape
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 British Association of Art Therapists.

Keywords

  • art-based research
  • Art-based supervision
  • heuristic research
  • One-Canvas model
  • supervisor’s role

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology

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