The motivational properties of future time perspective future orientation: Different approaches, different cultures

Rachel Seginer, Willy Lens

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter has three parts. The first two present two approaches, which although developed independently, share thematic and motivational properties: future time perspective (FTP) (Lens) and future orientation (FO) (Seginer). Of the rich FTP conceptualization and research the chapter addresses extension and the content of future-set goals, particularly relating to intrinsic and extrinsic goals and autonomous vs. controlled motivation. Drawing on empirical research, it emphasizes that extrinsic goals may also have qualities of autonomous motivation. A concluding comment relates to the past and present motivational properties. The FO approach is a domain-specific, three-component model by which the cognitive representation of the future is preceded by motivational forces and results in behavioral outcomes, also affected by the motivational forces. It is empirically fit for gender, age, and cultural groups. An extended model including interpersonal antecedents and developmental outcomes is domain by culture specific. The third part aligns the two, indicating commonalities, complementarities, and continued research.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTime Perspective Theory; Review, Research and Application
Subtitle of host publicationEssays in Honor of Philip G. Zimbardo
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages287-304
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9783319073682
ISBN (Print)9783319073675
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (all)
  • Social Sciences (all)
  • Arts and Humanities (all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The motivational properties of future time perspective future orientation: Different approaches, different cultures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this