The implications of having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in male adolescents with intellectual disability

Eli Carmeli, Neomy Klein, Mordechai Sohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is currently defined as a cognitive/behavioral developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a correlation between social skills and ADHD among adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID). The study concerns the specific cognitive and adaptive skills of adolescents dually diagnosed with mild intellectual disabilities and comorbid pathology as ADHD. Three age-and IQ-match groups (males, n=12 in each group) were investigated. Group I - composed of adolescent diagnosed with mild ID, group II - adolescents diagnosed with ADHD, and group III -adolescent diagnosed with ID and ADHD. The instruments used in the study were Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC, according to the chronological age of the subjects) and the short version of the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC). Results confirm that comorbidity is a factor differentiating. ADHD strongly increased the impairment of social skills, while behavioral disorders were less damaging in ID performance. The WISC and DBC instruments should be used with confidence in clinical and service settings, to allow a better assessment of co-occurrence morbidity in adolescents with ID. The interactions between intellectual disability and psychopathology behavior highlight the need to plan a more accurate diagnosis and appropriate rehabilitative intervention program, essential for improving the quality of life of the ID population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-214
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Intellectual disability
  • Israel
  • Residential care
  • Social skills

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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