The effect of co-dependent (thinking in motion [TIM]) versus single-modality (CogniFit) interventions on cognition and gait among community-dwelling older adults with cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled study

Shiri Embon-Magal, Tal Krasovsky, Israel Doron, Kfir Asraf, Iris Haimov, Efrat Gil, Maayan Agmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cognition and motor skills are interrelated throughout the aging process and often show simultaneous deterioration among older adults with cognitive impairment. Co-dependent training has the potential to ameliorate both domains; however, its effect on the gait and cognition of older adults with cognitive impairment has yet to be explored. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of the well-established single-modality cognitive computerized training program, CogniFit, with "Thinking in Motion (TIM)," a co-dependent group intervention, among community-dwelling older adults with cognitive impairment. METHODS: Employing a single-blind randomized control trial design, 47 community-dwelling older adults with cognitive impairment were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of thrice-weekly trainings of TIM or CogniFit. Pre- and post-intervention assessments included cognitive performance, evaluated by a CogniFit battery, as a primary outcome; and gait, under single- and dual-task conditions, as a secondary outcome. RESULTS: CogniFit total Z scores significantly improved from baseline to post-intervention for both groups. There was a significant main effect for time [F (1, 44) = 17.43, p < .001, ηp2 = .283] but not for group [F (1, 44) = 0.001, p = .970]. No time X group interaction [F (1, 44) = 1.29, p = .261] was found. No changes in gait performance under single and dual-task performance were observed in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The findings show that single-modality (CogniFit) and co-dependent (TIM) trainings improve cognition but not gait in older adults with cognitive impairment. Such investigations should be extended to include various populations and a broader set of outcome measurements. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN12616001543471. Date: 08/11/2016.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)720
Number of pages1
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 31 Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022. The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Brain aging
  • Motor-cognitive intervention
  • Remedial intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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