Surviving intimate partner violence in a segregated community: the case of ultra-Orthodox Jewish women

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Abstract

As a “faith-based community”, the ultra-Orthodox society is a differentiated minority group, which has recently recognised intimate partner violence as a social problem. The members of this conservative, patriarchal society keep themselves in a secluded sphere, apart from the modern, secular Western society. The aim of this paper is to explore the experience of ultra-Orthodox women coping with intimate partner violence. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 17 ultra-Orthodox women coping with intimate partner violence in Israel, 27–49 years of age, all clients of the social services. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: The experience of not being able to build a “faithful Jewish home”; strengthening one’s faith as a means to survival; and the meaning of “tikun” and choice. The impact of these findings is examined in the context of culture-sensitive interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)519-531
Number of pages13
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Violence against women
  • cultural sensitivity
  • faith-based communities
  • qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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