Stress-related aftermaths to workplace politics: The relationships among politics, job distress, and aggressive behavior in organizations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In light of the growing theoretical and practical interest on organizational politics, especially its probable impact on work outcomes, two stress-related aftermaths of influence and politics in organizations were examined. On the basis of a model by Ferris, Russ, and Fandt (1989b) the idea was pursued that workplace politics may have a long-range impact on employees' job distress and aggressive behavior in and around organizations. Three samples (n1 = 155, n2 = 184, n3 = 201) were used to examine direct and indirect/mediating relationships among the research variables. Participants were Israeli employees from the private, public, and third sectors. Findings showed that: (1) job distress was an immediate response to organizational politics across the three types of organization, and (2) job distress proved a possible mediator between organizational politics and aggressive behavior as enacted by the employees themselves. Several theoretical and practical implications of the findings that may extend our knowledge on various stress-related aftermaths of organizational politics are noted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-591
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology (all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Stress-related aftermaths to workplace politics: The relationships among politics, job distress, and aggressive behavior in organizations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this