Stone lines and burnt bones: Ritual elaborations in Xiongnu mortuary arenas of Inner Asia

Bryan K. Miller, Cheryl A. Makarewicz, Jamsranjav Bayarsaikhan, Tömörbaatar Tüvshinjargal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The vast mortuary complexes of the Xiongnu, the world's first nomadic empire (c. 200 BC-AD 100), were important statements of elite power and ritual commemoration in Inner Asia. Very few of the features that accompanied the main tombs, however, have been fully excavated and investigated. This study is one of the first to assess completely the small archaeological features- A nd associated faunal remains-that surround the more monumental structures, features that intimate substantial investments in, and ritual activities around, these mortuary arenas. This research provides an important contribution to the understanding of the social politics of ritual practices and the development of complex institutions in steppe pastoral societies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1310-1328
Number of pages19
JournalAntiquity
Volume92
Issue number365
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Antiquity Publications Ltd.

Keywords

  • animal sacrifice
  • Inner Asia
  • Mongolia
  • ritual
  • Xiongnu

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • General Arts and Humanities

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