Stigma correlates in individuals with mental health conditions versus community members enrolled in a nationwide integrated arts-based community rehabilitation program in Israel

Aya Nitzan, Hod Orkibi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two of the most prominent challenges faced by people with mental health conditions (MHCs) are experiencing stigma and personal recovery. This study focused on the analysis of baseline data from registrants for integrated arts-based groups in a nationwide psychosocial rehabilitation program in Israel. The aim of the study was to examine the possible associations between self-stigma, personal recovery and creative self-efficacy (CSE) in people with MHCs, and the associations between public stigma, desire for social distance, familiarity with mental illness and CSE in community members. Cross-sectional data were collected by online survey software in October-November 2017 from 114 people with MHCs and 117 community members who enrolled in 15 integrated arts-based groups, and 68 people with MHCs who were not enrolled in integrated groups. The main findings suggest that individuals with MHCs who reported high self-stigma also reported a low sense of personal recovery and low CSE. The CSE of those with MHCs correlated positively with their personal recovery. Among community members, high public stigma was associated with a greater desire for social distance in women, but less contact with MHCs in men. Individuals with MHCs who had previously participated in integrated arts-based groups reported greater personal recovery than those who had not. Community members reported higher CSE and public stigma than the CSE and self-stigma of individuals with MHCs. The findings help characterise both individuals with MHCs and non-clinical community members who decide to enrol in integrated groups, as well as individuals with MHCs who chose not to enrol, enabling similar community-based programs to better identify their conditions and meet their needs. Future research should examine the contribution of integrated arts-based groups to promoting recovery and reducing stigma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1230-1240
Number of pages11
JournalHealth and Social Care in the Community
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • arts
  • community mental health
  • contact
  • creative self-efficacy
  • psychiatric rehabilitation
  • recovery
  • stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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