Speech loudness and quality 12 months after intensive voice treatment (LSVT®) for Parkinson's disease: A comparison with an alternative speech treatment

Shimon Sapir, Lorraine Olson Ramig, Patricia Hoyt, Stefanie Countryman, Christopher O'Brien, Margaret Hoehn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Thirty-five individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were enrolled in speech treatment. Twenty-two were enrolled in a high-effort phonatory-respiratory treatment program (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, LSVT®) and 13 were enrolled in a high-effort respiratory treatment program (RET). Perceptual judgments of speech loudness and quality were made independently by 6 listeners on recordings of the 'Rainbow Passage'. These recordings had been obtained just before treatment (pre) and at 12 months' follow-up (FU12). The speech samples in the LSVT group, but not in the RET group, were significantly more likely to be perceived 'louder' and 'better quality' at FU12 than at pre (p < 0.0001). These findings, along with others, suggest that the long-term effects of the LSVT are perceptible, clinically significant and treatment-specific. Copyright

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-303
Number of pages8
JournalFolia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Parkinson's disease
  • Perceptual voice judgment
  • Voice treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics
  • LPN and LVN
  • Linguistics and Language

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