Small intestinal hydrolysis of plant glucosides: Higher glucohydrolase activities in rodents than passerine birds

Krista M. Lessner, M. Denise Dearing, Ido Izhaki, Michal Samuni-Blank, Zeev Arad, William H. Karasov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Glycosides are a major group of plant secondary compounds characterized by one or more sugars conjugated to a lipophilic, possibly toxic aglycone, which is released upon hydrolysis. We compared small intestinal homogenate hydrolysis activity of three rodent and two avian species against four substrates: amygdalin and sinigrin, two plant-derived glucosides, the sugar lactose, whose hydrolysis models some activity against flavonoid and isoflavonoid glucosides, and the disaccharide sugar maltose (from starch), used as a comparator. Three new findings extend our understanding of physiological processing of plant glucosides: (1) the capacity of passerine birds to hydrolyze plant glucosides seems relatively low, compared with rodents; (2) in this first test of vertebrates' enzymic capacity to hydrolyze glucosinolates, sinigrin hydrolytic capacity seems low; (3) in laboratory mice, hydrolytic activity against lactose resides on the enterocytes' apical membrane facing the intestinal lumen, but activity against amygdalin seems to reside inside enterocytes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2666-2669
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume218
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

Keywords

  • Cytosolic β-glucosidase
  • Digestion
  • Enzyme
  • Lactase phlorizin hydrolase
  • Plant secondary compounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology

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