Sitting Time, Physical Activity, and Cognitive Impairment in Midlife and Older Adults

Tal Gafni, Kerem Shuval, Galit Weinstein, Carolyn E. Barlow, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Benjamin L. Willis, David Leonard, William L. Haskell, Laura F. DeFina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study cross-sectionally examines the relations of sitting and physical activity (PA) with cognitive impairment in community-dwelling adults aged 55-87 years (n = 3,780). Multivariable logistic regression assessed independent and joint relations of sitting and PA with Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores adjusting for covariates. Sitting ≥75% of the time and not meeting PA guidelines were related to 60% (95% confidence interval [CI] [1.19, 2.17]) and 27% (95% CI [1.06, 1.53]) higher odds for cognitive impairment, respectively. Stratification by age showed that sitting ≥75% of the time was associated with higher cognitive impairment odds in midlife (odds ratio [OR] = 1.86; 95% CI [1.31, 2.65]), but not older adults (OR = 1.06; 95% CI [0.57, 1.95]). Joint association analysis revealed that, overall, the highest odds for cognitive impairment were in those sitting ≥75% of the time while meeting or not meeting PA guidelines (OR = 1.69, 95% CI [1.13, 2.53]; and OR = 1.66, 95% CI [1.19, 2.32], respectively). In conclusion, prolonged sitting and insufficient PA are independent risk markers for cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-363
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2022

Keywords

  • cognitive function
  • leisure time activity
  • MoCA
  • sedentary behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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