“Sitting in the back seat”: The convergence of early recollections, self and others, and low socioeconomic class

Mia Levitt-Frank, Avihu Shoshana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This qualitative study examines the links between early recollections, self and others, and low socioeconomic class. Early recollections—specific memories from childhood—illustrate individuals’ core concepts about self and life. Social class is a cultural context that affects psychological processes. We conducted semistructured interviews with 12 low socioeconomic status participants and elicited at least 3 early recollections per participant (totaling 42 recollections). Themes that emerged from analysis of the early recollections include divided reality; creating meaning in the present (including enjoying life and making do with what one has); a parental role of admiration, security, and compensation; and social interest. We regard these strategies as creative assets and mechanisms to deal with a lack of control and resources, sense of constraint, and hierarchical and classed society. We encourage educational and therapeutic frameworks to recognize these assets as facets of psychological and cultural capital.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCurrent Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • Early recollections
  • Parental role
  • Self
  • Social class

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (all)

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