Sensory hypersensitivity as a contributing factor in the relation between sleep and behavioral disorders in normal schoolchildren

Tamar Shochat, Orna Tzischinsky, Batya Engel-Yeger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite growing interest in the relationship between sleep disturbances and behavioral disorders- specifically, symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children-the underlying structure of this relationship is poorly understood. The aim of the study was to explore the contribution of sensory hypersensitivity to this relationship. Parents of 56 schoolchildren completed questionnaires reporting sleep habits, behavior, and sensory processing. Significant correlations were found between global scores of all 3 constructs; however, the relationship between sleep and behavior decreased when controlling for sensory processing. Among different sensory modalities, tactile sensitivity was a significant predictor for sleep, accounting for 25% of the variance, F = 16.30, p < .001; and sensation seeking and tactile sensitivity were significant predictors for behavior, accounting for 42% of the variance, F = 17.56, p < .001. If confirmed by further objective investigation, the results of this study suggest that sensory profiles of children with sleep or behavioral disorders should be routinely assessed in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-62
Number of pages10
JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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