Retirement anxiety and depressive symptoms among middle-aged adults: An indirect effect through death anxiety

Dikla Segel-Karpas, Yoav S. Bergman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Basing our argument on Terror Management Theory, we posit that retirement is an age-related transition, which could result in greater death saliency and anxiety, leading to increased depressive symptoms. An indirect-effect model was tested on a convenience sample of 574 Israeli Jewish older workers (mean age = 57), finding that the link between retirement anxiety and depressive symptoms is mediated through death anxiety. Anxious anticipation of retirement could imply that the individual perceives it as an “end,” resulting in greater death saliency and death anxiety, which are related to poorer mental health. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-249
Number of pages5
JournalDeath Studies
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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