Response of Bacterial Communities to Rainwater Additions in the Oligotrophic SE Mediterranean Coast; Experimental and In-Situ Observations

Eyal Rahav, Yaron Gertner, Barak Herut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Wet deposition may serve as a source of external nutrients for phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria in low nutrients low chlorophyll (LNLC) marine systems. Here, we examined the effects of rainwater deposition on phytoplankton and bacterial abundance and activity in the LNLC SE Mediterranean coast. In-situ observations and experimentally controlled incubations show enhanced abundance and productivity of the bacterioplankton communities attributed to the addition of rainwater-born nutrients. While rainwater relieved N limitation to phytoplankton resulting in enhanced abundance and primary production of autotrophic microbial communities (mostly pico-eukaryotes), no single nutrient (N or P) could be identified as a sole limiting factor of the stimulated heterotrophic bacteria. In both the experimental and in-situ observations, the changes in phytoplankton biomass following rainwater deposition/addition was observed only after 24–48 h. Contrary, an increase in primary and bacterial productions was visible within a few hours, suggesting high nutrients turnover rates by bacterioplankton communities following rain deposition. These results emphasize the importance of short-term wet deposition events to new N production and phytoplankton temporal variability in the LNLC SE Mediterranean coast.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2020JG006143
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Volume126
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Tal Ozer and Eli Biton for processing the in‐situ fluorescence data from the Hadera monitoring station (run by IOLR). The authors gratefully acknowledge the NOAA Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) for the provision of the HYSPLIT transport and dispersion model used in this publication. This work was supported by the Israel Science Foundation (grant #1211/17) and by the National Israeli monitoring program of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. We also acknowledge the ENVIMED MERMEX TRACOMED project.

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Tal Ozer and Eli Biton for processing the in-situ fluorescence data from the Hadera monitoring station (run by IOLR). The authors gratefully acknowledge the NOAA Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) for the provision of the HYSPLIT transport and dispersion model used in this publication. This work was supported by the Israel Science Foundation (grant #1211/17) and by the National Israeli monitoring program of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. We also acknowledge the ENVIMED MERMEX TRACOMED project.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords

  • Eastern Mediterranean Sea
  • nutrients
  • phytoplankton
  • primary production
  • rain deposition
  • wet deposition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Forestry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Paleontology
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology

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