Relationships between executive functions and sensory patterns among adults with specific learning disabilities as reflected in their daily functioning

Kineret Sharfi, Sara Rosenblum, Sonya Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Adults with specific learning disabilities (e.g., dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia) reveal limitations in daily functioning in various life domains. Following previous evidence of deficient executive functions and unique sensory patterns in this population, this study examined how relationships between these two domains are expressed in daily functioning. Participants included 55 adults with specific learning disabilities and 55 controls matched by age, gender, socioeconomic status, and education. Participants completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Functions–adult version, and the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile. Results indicated significant relationships between executive functions (per the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Functions–adult version) and sensory patterns (per the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile) as reflected in daily functioning. The low sensory registration pattern predicted 12% to 16% of the variance in the behavioral regulation index, metacognitive index, and general executive composite scores and was a significant predictor of specific executive function abilities. Results indicated that the difficulties of adults with specific learning disabilities in using executive function abilities efficiently might be tied to a high sensory threshold and passive self-regulation strategies. A deeper understanding of this population’s sensory–executive mechanisms may improve evaluation and intervention processes. This understanding can consequently increase executive abilities for improved daily functioning and life satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0266385
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume17
Issue number4 April
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright: © 2022 Sharfi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Relationships between executive functions and sensory patterns among adults with specific learning disabilities as reflected in their daily functioning'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this