Psychological symptomatology among Palestinian male and female adolescents living under political violence 2004-2005

Rachel Lev-Wiesel, Alean Al-Krenawi, Mahmud A. Sehwail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate gender differences in relation to exposure to domestic violence, political violence, family relations and psychological symptomatology in Palestinian adolescents. The sample consisted of 1766 adolescents, males (54.1%) and females (45.9%), residents of West Bank cities subjected to violent political conflict. Participants completed a self-report questionnaire consisting of the following measures: demographic variables, domestic violence, political violence events, the McMaster Family Assessment Device, and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) psychological symptomatology. Results indicated that whereas there was no significant difference in the level of exposure to political violence between boys and girls, female adolescents exhibited higher levels of psychological symptoms compared to their male counterparts. Girls also reported higher levels of exposure to domestic violence and lower levels of family function than boys.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-56
Number of pages8
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Gender
  • Palestinians
  • Political violence
  • Psychological symptomatology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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