Professional ethics of psychologists and physicians: Morality, confidentiality, and sexuality in Israel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Clinical psychologists' and nonpsychiatric physicians' attitudes and behaviors in sexual and confidentiality boundary violations were examined. The 171 participants' responses were analyzed by profession, sex, and status (student, resident, professional) on semantic differential, boundary violation vignettes, and a version of Pope, Tabachnick, and Keith-Spiegel's (1987) ethical scale. Psychologists rated sexual boundary violation as more unethical than did physicians (p < .001). Rationale (p < .01) and timing (p < .0001) influenced ratings. Psychologists reported fewer sexualized behaviors than physicians (p < 05). Professional experience (p < .01) and sex (p < .05) were associated with confidence-violating behavior. Overall, 78% of the sample reported attitudes or behaviors associated with boundary violations. The behavior violations were correlated (r = .49). Actual violators rated vignette violators more leniently than did nonviolators (p < .01).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-228
Number of pages16
JournalEthics and Behavior
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology
  • Social Psychology

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