Pre-service teachers’ desire to control bias: Implications for the endorsement of culturally affirming classroom practices

Revathy Kumar, De Leon L. Gray, Nurit Kaplan Toren

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The study integrates social-psychological and educational research to examine the relations between preservice teachers’ race-related perceptions of Black students and the instructional approaches they endorse. Based on survey and race Implicit Association Test data from preservice teachers (N = 258; White = 82%) in the United States, we predicted that the association between motivation to be unprejudiced and motivation to appear unprejudiced would predict endorsement of culturally and motivationally supportive instructional practices via implicit and explicit biases about Black students. Path analyses revealed significant mediated associations among motivation to be unprejudiced and endorsed instructional approaches and practices via explicit bias, contingent on the motivation to appear unprejudiced. Furthermore, it is troubling to note that White preservice teachers, in contrast to their ethnic minority counterparts, displayed significant implicit preference for White over Black students. Implications of these findings for preparing a culturally responsive and motivational supportive teaching task-force are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number101512
    JournalLearning and Instruction
    Volume78
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 2022

    Bibliographical note

    Publisher Copyright:
    © 2021

    Keywords

    • Achievement goal theory
    • Culturally responsive teaching
    • Explicit stereotype beliefs
    • Implicit race bias
    • Motivation to control prejudice

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education
    • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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