Posttraumatic stress symptom severity predicts marijuana use coping motives among traumatic event-exposed marijuana users

Marcel O. Bonn-Miller, Anka A. Vujanovic, Matthew T. Feldner, Amit Bernstein, Michael J. Zvolensky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study examines the relation between posttraumatic stress symptom severity and motives for marijuana use among 103 (55 women) young adult marijuana users (current) who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event in their lifetime. As expected, after covarying for the theoretically relevant variables of frequency of past 30-day marijuana use, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and volume of alcohol consumed, posttraumatic stress symptom severity was significantly related to marijuana use coping motives, but no other motives for marijuana use. Results are discussed in relation to better understanding the role of coping-motivated marijuana use among young adults experiencing posttraumatic stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)577-586
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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