Phonological confusability in short‐term memory for sentences as a predictor of reading ability

Anthony F. Jorm, David L. Share, Rod Maclean, Russell Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Upon entry to kindergarten, a group of 477 children was given sentence memory tasks involving rhyming and non‐rhyming sentences. These tasks were readministered to the children at the end of Grade 1 when the children were also tested for reading ability. Short‐term memory for sentences was found to correlate with Grade 1 reading ability on both occasions when it was tested. Furthermore, at both ages the children found rhyming sentences harder to recall than non‐rhyming sentences. However, contrary to some previous research, the study failed to find that poor readers were less severely penalized when the short‐term memory sentence stimuli rhymed. The possible role of scaling artifacts in producing inconsistent results between studies is discussed. 1984 The British Psychological Society

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-400
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Psychology
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1984
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (all)

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