Perceived parenting style, self-esteem and psychological distress in adolescents with heart disease

Miri Cohen, Daniela Mansoor, Roni Gagin, Avraham Lorber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between perceived parenting style, depressed mood, anxiety and self-esteem in adolescents with heart disease compared with healthy adolescents. Forty-five adolescents, aged 12-18 with congenital or acquired heart disease and 50 healthy age-matched adolescents answered perceived parental behaviour, self-esteem, depressed mood and anxiety questionnaires. The study group reported higher perceived acceptance and lower perceived parental control than healthy adolescents, but similar levels of depressed mood, anxiety and self-esteem. Fischer's r-to-z transformation and regression analyses showed different associations between perceived parenting style and depressed mood, anxiety and self esteem. In the study group, higher perceived parental acceptance was associated with lower depressed mood and higher self-esteem, whereas these associations were not significant in the control group. In the control, but not the study group, higher perceived parental control was associated with lower depressed mood and lower anxiety. Parenting style proved to exert a differential effect on adolescents with and without heart disease. For the former, perceived parental acceptance had a more substantial effect on psychological well-being than perceived parental control. Professionals caring for these adolescents should be aware of the special importance of parenting style on the well-being of adolescents with heart disease, and address this issue in the clinical setting with the patients and their parents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-388
Number of pages8
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

Keywords

  • Adolescents with heart disease
  • Anxiety
  • Depressed mood
  • Perceived parenting style
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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