Patterns of Polysubstance Use in Young Black and Latinx Sexual Minority Men and Transgender Women and Its Association with Sexual Partnership Factors: The PUSH Study

Renata Arrington-Sanders, Noya Galai, Oluwaseun Falade-Nwulia, Christopher Hammond, Andrea Wirtz, Chris Beyrer, Aubrey Arteaga, David Celentano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Adult studies have demonstrated that polysubstance use increases HIV acquisition risk through increased sexual behaviors, however, few studies have examined polysubstance in young Black and Latinx sexual minority men (SMM) and transgender women (TW). Methods: We used cross-sectional data from 466 young Black and Latinx SMM and TW living in four high HIV-burden US cities enrolled in the PUSH Study, a status-neutral randomized control trial to increase HIV prevention and treatment adherence. We examined data for patterns of polysubstance use comparing age differences of use and explored associations between substance use and sexual partnership factors - inconsistent condom use, pressure to have condomless anal sex, and older partner, using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Most participants described prior substance use with alcohol and cannabis being most common (76% each) and 23% described other illicit drug use, including stimulants, cocaine, hallucinogens, sedatives, opioids, and inhalants. Polysubstance use was common with nearly half (47%) of participants reporting alcohol and cannabis use, 20% reporting alcohol, cannabis, and one other illicit drug use, and 19% reporting alcohol or cannabis use plus one other illicit drug use. Polysubstance use was associated with greater adjusted odds of pressure to have condomless anal sex, older partner (>5 years older), and inconsistent condom use. Conclusions: Associations of polysubstance use with sexual practices and sexual partnerships that are known predictors of HIV acquisition or transmission among Black and Latinx SMM and TW underscore the need for combination interventions that include substance use treatment alongside antiretroviral-based and partner-based HIV prevention and treatment interventions. Trial Registration:ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03194477.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Latinx
  • Young
  • black
  • polysubstance
  • sexual minority men
  • transgender women
  • use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Patterns of Polysubstance Use in Young Black and Latinx Sexual Minority Men and Transgender Women and Its Association with Sexual Partnership Factors: The PUSH Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this