Newly Identified Nematodes from Mono Lake Exhibit Extreme Arsenic Resistance

Pei Yin Shih, James Siho Lee, Ryoji Shinya, Natsumi Kanzaki, Andre Pires-daSilva, Jean Marie Badroos, Elizabeth Goetz, Amir Sapir, Paul W. Sternberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Shih et al. isolate eight nematode species from the arsenic-rich Mono Lake, previously thought to contain only two animal species. One of the Mono Lake nematodes is culturable and shows high arsenic resistance. Resistance in closely related non-extremophile species raises the possibility that nematodes are widely pre-adapted to be extremophiles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3339-3344.e4
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume29
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - 7 Oct 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Dr. Avi BarMassada for the map of Mono Lake, Dr. Stephanie A. Connon for advice on collecting and preserving samples from Mono Lake, Dr. Tim Hollibaugh for suggestions on replicating Mono Lake conditions in the laboratory, Prof. Joe Parker for suggestions on building phylogenetic trees, Prof. Tsui-Fen Chou for advice on calculating relative arsenic resistance, and Dr. Nathan Dalleska at the Environmental Analysis Center at Caltech for help on soil property measurements. J.M.B. was supported by the Amgen Scholars Program . A.P.-d.S. acknowledges funding by Leverhulme Trust ( RPG-2016-089 ). P.W.S was an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute , which supported this work.

Funding Information:
We thank Dr. Avi BarMassada for the map of Mono Lake, Dr. Stephanie A. Connon for advice on collecting and preserving samples from Mono Lake, Dr. Tim Hollibaugh for suggestions on replicating Mono Lake conditions in the laboratory, Prof. Joe Parker for suggestions on building phylogenetic trees, Prof. Tsui-Fen Chou for advice on calculating relative arsenic resistance, and Dr. Nathan Dalleska at the Environmental Analysis Center at Caltech for help on soil property measurements. J.M.B. was supported by the Amgen Scholars Program. A.P.-d.S. acknowledges funding by Leverhulme Trust (RPG-2016-089). P.W.S was an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, which supported this work. Conceptualization, P.-Y.S. J.S.L. R.S. A.S. and P.W.S.; Formal Analysis, P.-Y.S. J.S.L. R.S. N.K. A.P.-d.S. and A.S; Investigation, P.-Y.S. J.S.L. R.S. N.K. A.P.-d.S. J.M.B. and A.S.; Resources, A.P.-d.S. E.G. and A.S.; Writing – Original Draft, P.-Y.S. and J.S.L.; Writing – Review & Editing, P.-Y.S. J.S.L. R.S. N.K. E.G. A.S. and P.W.S.; Visualization, P.-Y.S. J.S.L. R.S. and N.K.; Supervision, A.S. and P.W.S.; Funding Acquisition, P.W.S. The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • arsenic
  • extremophiles
  • Mono Lake
  • nematodes
  • preadaptation
  • resilience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (all)

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