Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes may serve as a potential marker for pancreatic cancer

Rachel Dankner, Laurence S. Freedman, Hertzel C. Gerstein, Jesse Roth, Lital Keinan-Boker

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Debate

Abstract

Pancreatic cancer has an extremely highly case fatality. Diabetes is a well-established strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Compared with a nondiabetic population, we previously reported a 15- and 14-fold greater risk for detecting pancreatic cancer during the first year after diagnosing diabetes in adult women and men, respectively, which dropped during the second year to 5.4-fold and 3.5-fold, respectively, and stabilized around 3-fold for the rest of the 11-year follow-up in our historical cohort. The population attributable risk during the 11-year period was 13.3% and 14.1% in prevalent diabetic women and men, respectively. This means that one out of about every 8 patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer has been previously diagnosed with diabetes. The globally high prevalence of diabetes and the aggravating implications of a delayed pancreatic cancer diagnosis call for newly-onset diabetes to be considered a potential marker for an underlying pancreatic cancer and addressed accordingly.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere3018
JournalDiabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The original study was funded by the European Foundation for the

Funding Information:
The original study was funded by the European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes (EFSD). We would like to acknowledge Prof Ran Balicer for his collaboration on data acquisition.

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Keywords

  • early detection
  • newly diagnosed diabetes
  • pancreatic cancer
  • population attributable risk PAR
  • prevention
  • prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes may serve as a potential marker for pancreatic cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this