New evidence for the processing of wild cereal grains at ohalo II, a 23 000-yearold campsite on the shore of the sea of Galilee, Israel

Dani Nadel, Dolores R. Piperno, Irene Holst, Ainit Snir, Ehud Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Traces of starch found on a large flat stone discovered in the hunter-fisher-gatherer site of Ohalo II famously represent the first identification of Upper Palaeolithic grinding of grasses. Given the importance of this discovery for the use of edible grain, further analyses have now been undertaken. Meticulous sampling combined with good preservation allow the authors to demonstrate that the Ohalo II stone was certainly used for the routine processing of wild cereals, wheat, barley and now oats among them, around 23 000 years ago.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)990-1003
Number of pages14
JournalAntiquity
Volume86
Issue number334
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Barley
  • Cereal processing
  • Israel
  • Oats
  • Ohalo II
  • Sea of Galilee
  • Upper Palaeolithic
  • Wheat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Arts and Humanities (all)

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