Mothers’ Narratives on their Immigration Experiences: Associations with Maternal Relatedness and Adolescent Adjustment

Efrat Sher-Censor, Arava Mizrachi-Zinman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the hypothesis that lower maternal relatedness mediates the associations of immigrant mothers’ acculturative stress and lack of benefit finding in immigration with poorer adjustment of their adolescents in terms of more externalizing problems and lower school achievements and self-worth. Participants were 93 adolescents (47.31% girls, Mage = 16.04) and their mothers (Mage = 45.83) from middle-class families. Mothers immigrated to Israel from the Former Soviet Union or Western countries (Myears-in-Israel = 19.75). We used a multimethod multi-informant approach that included a novel narrative procedure for assessing acculturative stress and benefit finding. Structural Equation Modeling supported the hypothesis, suggesting that research on and practice with adolescents in immigrant families should consider the meaning parents derive from their immigration experiences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-367
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Society for Research on Adolescence.

Keywords

  • Israel
  • acculturative stress
  • adolescent adjustment
  • benefit finding
  • middle class

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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