Mental adjustment, coping strategies, and psychological distress among end-stage renal disease patients

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Abstract

Objective: The study examines the association between mental adjustment, coping strategies [emotion (EF) and problem focused (PF)], and psychological distress. Method: Sixty end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients were interviewed a year or more after they began dialysis, measured by the COPE, Mental Adjustment to Cancer (MAC), and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) scales. Results: The main findings indicate that patients with a strong fighting spirit are in less psychological distress. Moreover, patients who tend to use PF strategies rely on a fighting spirit as an adjustment coping style. Conclusion: ESRD patients in the adjustment phase (patients diagnosed at least 1 year previously) tend to struggle to lead as normal a life as possible despite the dependency caused by the illness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471-476
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Keywords

  • Coping strategies
  • Distress
  • End-stage renal disease
  • Mental adjustment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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