Marijuana coping motives interact with marijuana use frequency to predict anxious arousal, panic related catastrophic thinking, and worry among current marijuana users

Marcel O. Bonn-Miller, Michael J. Zvolensky, Amit Bernstein, Timothy R. Stickle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present investigation evaluated whether coping motives for marijuana use interacted with past 30-day frequency of marijuana use in relation to anxiety-relevant variables among community-recruited young adult marijuana users (n = 149). As expected, after covarying cigarettes per day, alcohol use, and total years of marijuana use, the interaction between frequency of past 30-day marijuana use and coping motives predicted anxious arousal symptoms, agoraphobic cognitions, and worry. Marijuana users who demonstrated high use frequency and high coping motives demonstrated the highest levels of anxiety across these anxiety-relevant criterion variables. No such effects were evident, as expected, for depressive symptoms, offering explanatory specificity for anxiety relative to depressive factors. These results are discussed in relation to better understanding the role of marijuana use and coping motives in regard to anxiety vulnerability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)862-873
Number of pages12
JournalDepression and Anxiety
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Anxiety
  • Coping
  • Marijuana
  • Panic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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