Learning to listen: Downstream effects of listening training on employees' relatedness, burnout, and turnover intentions

Guy Itzchakov, Netta Weinstein, Arik Cheshin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present work focuses on listening training as an example of a relational human resource practice that can improve human resource outcomes: Relatedness to colleagues, burnout, and turnover intentions. In two quasi-field experiments, employees were assigned to either a group listening training or a control condition. Both immediately after training and after 3 weeks later, receiving listening training was shown to be linked to higher feelings of relatedness with colleagues, lower burnout, and lower turnover intentions. These findings suggest that listening training can be harnessed as a powerful human resource management tool to cultivate stronger relationships at work. The implications for Relational Coordination Theory, High-Quality Connections Theory, and Self-Determination Theory are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHuman Resource Management
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The research was supported by grant #460/18 from the Israel Science Foundation to the first author. 1

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Human Resource Management published by Wiley Periodicals LLC.

Keywords

  • burnout
  • human resource management
  • listening
  • training
  • workplace relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Learning to listen: Downstream effects of listening training on employees' relatedness, burnout, and turnover intentions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this