Learning the Learning Sciences: An investigation of newcomers' sociocultural ideas

Yotam Hod, Ornit Sagy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The sociocultural perspective is one of the key ideas of the Learning Sciences. For the field to sustain and expand its collective knowledge and practices, it is vital to enculturate sociocultural thinking to new generations of scholars and practitioners. In this short paper, we advance this goal by investigating the way students who study the Learning Sciences come to view learning from a sociocultural perspective. Here, we focus upon one case study within the context of an affiliate of the Network of Academic Programs in the Learning Sciences. Our findings indicate three ideas that signify sociocultural thinking: (1) Collaboration-as-learning; (2) Culture as relevant to learning; and (3) Learning as a process.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2016
Subtitle of host publicationTransforming Learning, Empowering Learners, Proceedings
EditorsChee-Kit Looi, Joseph L. Polman, Peter Reimann, Ulrike Cress
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages807-810
Number of pages4
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)9780990355083
StatePublished - 2016
Event12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners, ICLS 2016 - Singapore, Singapore
Duration: 20 Jun 201624 Jun 2016

Conference

Conference12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners, ICLS 2016
Country/TerritorySingapore
CitySingapore
Period20/06/1624/06/16

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© ISLS.

Keywords

  • Collaboration
  • Enculturation
  • Higher education
  • Learning community
  • Sociocultural

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

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