Juggling between caregiving and selfactualization: Older parents' lifelong experience of caring for an adult child with developmental disabilities

Hila Avieli, Tova Band-Winterstein, Alon Zamir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recently, the number of adults with Developmental Disabilities (DD) who live with their parents has increased. This study aims to explore how parents report retrospectively and interpret their experience in the context of self-actualization in the long-term care of a child with a developmental disability. Four forms of parents' experiences emerged from the analysis: "This child is my whole world"-Total devotion; "I Can Do Both"-Actualizing personal and familial goals as well as caregiving issues; "It's a mission, it's a calling, it's a full-time job"-Self-actualization through caregiving; and "Disability will not stop me"-Emphasizing self-actualization. While prior studies have created a distinct separation between caregiving and self-actualization, the current study focuses on the complex dynamics of lifelong parental caregiving for a child with DD, illustrating the parents' ways of actualizing their life goals in the context of caregiving over the years.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0276779
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume17
Issue number11 November
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding:Thestudywassupportedby:TheShalem FundforDevelopmentofServicesforPeoplewith IntellectualDisabilitiesintheLocalCouncils.grant number:123/2017 Competinginterests:Theauthorshavedeclared thatnocompetinginterestsexist.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Avieli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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