Information Seeking as A Predictor of Risk Behavior: Testing A Behavior and Risk Information Engagement Model (BRIE)

Nehama Lewis, Lourdes S. Martinez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prior theoretical models of information seeking have examined its role, primarily, as a determinant of recommended behaviors. In this study, we develop and test the “behavior and risk information engagement” (BRIE) model, which accounts for the reciprocal effects of information seeking from interpersonal and media sources on two risk behaviors–nonmedical marijuana and amphetamine use. We test the model among young Israeli adults (N = 800) using a three-wave prospective observational study (at 6-month intervals). Autoregressive cross-lagged structural equation models showed good fit. Information seeking from interpersonal sources at baseline predicted amphetamine use and marijuana use at 6 months. In both models, seeking drug-related information from interpersonal sources at baseline was also a predictor of seeking information from media sources at 6 months. Information seeking from media sources at 6 months was also a significant predictor of amphetamine use at 12 months. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)474-483
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jun 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
©, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Communication
  • Library and Information Sciences

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