Impaired phonological and orthographic word representations among adult dyslexic readers: Evidence from event-related potentials

Ann Meyler, Zvia Breznitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors examined the processing of phonological and orthographic word representations among 17 dyslexic and 16 normal college-level readers using Event-Related Potential measures. They focused on 2 early components—the P200 and the P300. The results revealed P200 and P300 components of lower amplitude and later latency among dyslexic readers than among normal readers for both types of word representation. Group differences were greatest for phonological representations. In addition, the authors observed greater time gaps among dyslexic readers than among normal readers between different processing stages (i.e., between P2 and P3 peaks, between P3 and reaction time). Combined, the data suggest a consistent speed-of-processing deficit among dyslexic readers that is evident within and between stages of cognitive processing. The results are discussed in the context of deficits in stimulus encoding and working memory. In addition, the authors discuss the need for accurate timing and synchronization of phonological and orthographic codes for efficient word recognition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-240
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Genetic Psychology
Volume166
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Dyslexia
  • Event-related potentials
  • Speed of processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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