How to get through hard times: Principals' listening buffers teachers' stress on turnover intention and promotes organizational citizenship behavior

Roy Rave, Guy Itzchakov, Netta Weinstein, Harry T. Reis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

When principals listen to their teachers, they may foster an open and receptive work environment that helps teachers adapt during stressful times. Two studies examined the role of perceived principals’ listening to teachers on workplace outcomes. Study 1 (N = 218) was conducted during the first nationwide lockdown in Israel. Study 2 (N = 247) was conducted during a later lockdown and controlled for social support to test the independent effects of the two distinct interpersonal experiences. Findings supported our hypothesis that principals’ listening would relate to lower teacher turnover intention. In addition, in line with our hypothesis, teachers high on perceived stress generally reported higher turnover intentions. However, the detrimental effect of perceived stress was not observed when teachers evaluated their principals as good listeners. Finally, we anticipated and found that principal listening is associated with organizational citizenship behavior. Specifically, teachers were more likely to help one another when feeling listened to by their principals.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCurrent Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by grant Number 1235/21 from the Israeli Science Foundation to Dr. Guy Itzchakov.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Listening
  • OCB
  • Principals
  • Stress
  • Teachers
  • Turnover Intentions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (all)

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